The CFAA Law : Heinous Word By Heinous Word

1. Computer Fraud and Abuse Act Storage Ctrs., Inc. v. Safeguard Self Storage, Inc.,
119 F. Supp. 2d 1121, 1125
(W.D. Wash. 2000);
Ervin & Smith Advertising and Public Relations, Inc. v. Ervin, 2009 WL 249998 (D. Neb. 2009). Some of these cases further suggest that such a breach can occur when the user decides to access the computer for a purpose that is contrary to the interests of the authorizing party.
See, e.g.,Citrin, 440 F.3d at 420 (defendant’s authorization to access computer terminated when he resolved to destroy employer’s files);
ViChip Corp. v. Lee, 438 F. Supp. 2d 1087, 1100 (N.D. Cal. 2006) (same); NCMIC Finance Corp. v. Artino, 638 F. Supp. 2d 1042, 1057 (S.D. Iowa 2009) (“[T]he determinative question is whether Artino breached his duty of loyalty to NCMIC when Artino obtained information from NCMIC’s computers.”).
The Citrin/Shurgard line of cases has been criticized by courts adopting the view that, under the CFAA, an authorized user of a computer cannot access the computer “without authorization” unless and until the authorization is revoked. Most significantly, the Ninth Circuit recently rejected Citrin’s interpretation of “without authorization” and found that, under the plain language of the CFAA, a user’s authorization to access a computer depends on the actions of the authorizing party and not on the user’s duty of loyalty.
See LVRC Holdings LLC v. Brekka, 581 F.3d 1127, 1133-34 (9th Cir. 2009) (“It is the employer’s decision to allow or to terminate an employee’s authorization to access a computer that determines whether the employee is with or ‘without authorization.’”). The court also suggested that Citrin’s reading of the CFAA is inconsistent with the rule of lenity, which requires courts to construe any ambiguity in a criminal statute against the government. Id.at 1134-35. The court then held that “a person uses a computer ‘without authorization’ . . . when the person has not received permission to use the computer for any purpose (such as when a hacker accesses someone’s computer without any permission), or when the employer has rescinded permission to access the computer and the defendant uses the computer anyway.” Id.at 1135.
Several district courts have also recently moved away from the Citrin/Shurgard view that a user can lose authorization to access a computer by F.3d 418 (7th Cir. 2006) (“Plaintiffs do not assert that Citrin accessed a computer without authorization.”). After analyzing the § 1030(a)(5)(A)(i) claim that plaintiff actually alleged, the Seventh Circuit then opined that the defendant had also violated § 1030(a)(5)(A)(ii) (now § 1030(a)(5)(B)), which did require that the defendant access a computer without authorization.
See Citrin, 440 F.3d at 420. The court appears to have been discussing this hypothetical §1030(a)(5)(A)(ii) claim when it stated that an employee could lose authorization to access his employer’s computer by breaching a duty of loyalty to the employer.
Prosecuting Computer Crimes breaching a duty of loyalty to the authorizing party.
See, e.g., Bell Aerospace Services, Inc. v. U.S. Aero Services, Inc., 690 F. Supp. 2d 1267 (M.D. Ala. 2010);
U.S. Bioservices v. Lugo, 595 F. Supp. 2d 1189 (D. Kan. 2009);
Losco Foods v. Hall & Shaw Sales, 600 F. Supp. 2d 1045 (E.D. Mo. 2009);
Bro-Tech Corp. v. Thermax, Inc., 651 F. Supp. 2d 378, 407-08 (E.D. Pa. 2009);
Shamrock Foods Co. v. Gast, 535 F. Supp. 2d 962, 964-967 (D. Ariz. 2008);
Diamond Power Int’l, Inc. v. Davidson, 540 F. Supp. 2d 1322, 1342 (N.D. Ga. 2007);
B&B Microscopes v. Armogida, 532 F. Supp. 2d 744, 758 (W.D. Pa. 2007);
Lockheed Martin Corp. v. Speed, 2006 WL 2683058, at *4 (M.D. Fla. 2006). These courts, like the Ninth Circuit, generally hold that an authorized computer user can never access the computer “without authorization” unless and until the authorization is rescinded.
See, e.g., Shamrock Foods, 535 F. Supp. 2d at 967 (“[A] violation for accessing ‘without authorization’ occurs only where initial access is not permitted.”).
Based on this recent case law, courts appear increasingly likely to reject the idea that a defendant accessed a computer “without authorization” in insider cases—cases where the defendant had some current authorization to access the computer. Accordingly, prosecutors should think carefully before charging such defendants with violations that require the defendants to access a computer “without authorization” and instead consider bringing charges under those subsections that require proof that the defendant exceeded authorized access.
Exceeding Authorized Access Several provisions of the CFAA impose criminal liability on a defendant who, among other things, “exceeds authorized access” when accessing a computer.
See 18 U.S.C. §§ 1030(a)(1), (a)(2), & (a)(4). The CFAA defines “exceeds authorized access” as “to access a computer with authorization and to use such access to obtain or alter information in the computer that the accesser is not entitled so to obtain or alter.”
18 U.S.C. §1030(e)(6). Accordingly, to prove that someone has “exceeded authorized access,” prosecutors should be prepared to present evidence showing (a) how the person’s authority to obtain or alter information on the computer was limited, rather than absolute, and (b) how the person exceeded those limitations in obtaining or altering information.
It is relatively easy to prove that a defendant had only limited authority to access a computer in cases where the defendant’s access was limited by “Viewing material on a computer screen constitutes ‘obtaining’ information under the CFAA.”
Healthcare Advocates, Inc. v. Harding, Earley, Follmer & Frailey, 497 F. Supp. 2d 627, 648 (E.D. Pa. 2007) (citing legislative history for CFAA).
1. Computer Fraud and Abuse Act restrictions that were memorialized in writing, such as terms of service, a computer access policy, a website notice, or an employment agreement or similar contract.
See, e.g.EF Cultural Travel BV v. Zefer Corp., 318 F.3d 58 (1st Cir. 2003) (website notices); Cont’l Group, Inc. v. KW Prop. Mgmt., LLC, 622 F.
Supp. 2d 1357, 1372 (S.D. Fla. 2009) (computer access policies); United States v. Drew, 259 F.R.D. 449 (C.D. Cal. 2009) (website terms of service); Modis, Inc. v. Bardelli, 531 F. Supp. 2d 314, 319 (D. Conn. 2008) (employment agreement);
Hewlett-Packard Co. v. Byd:Sign, Inc., 2007 WL 275476, at *13 (E.D. Tex. 2007) (confidentiality agreement); Am. Online, Inc. v. Nat’l Health Care Discount, Inc., 174 F. Supp. 2d 890, 899 (N.D. Iowa 2001) (email terms of service). In addition, password protection is an implicit (and technological) limit on access for otherwise authorized users who are not given the password.
See EF Cultural Travel BV v. Zefer Corp., 318 F.3d 58 (1st Cir. 2003). However, courts have split on the question of whether limits on authorized access can be reasonably inferred from the circumstances in cases where no explicit or implicit restrictions on access existed.
Compare EF Cultural Travel BV v. Zefer Corp., 318 F.3d 58 (1st Cir. 2003) (rejecting “reasonable expectations” test for lack of authorization), with United States v. Phillips, 477 F.3d 215, 219 (5th Cir. 2007) (“Courts have . . . typically analyzed the scope of a user’s authorization to access a protected computer on the basis of the expected norms of intended use or the nature of the relationship established between the computer owner and the user.”).
The most commonly litigated issue about “exceeding authorized access” in reported opinions is whether a particular defendant exceeded authorized access by accessing the computer for an improper purpose. Although United States v. Drew confirms that the government may rely on a website’s terms of service to establish that a website user exceeded her authorization to access the site, the district court also held in that case that the CFAA is unconstitutionally vague to the extent that it permits a defendant to be charged with a misdemeanor violation of § 1030(a)(2)(C) based on a conscious violation of a website’s terms of service. 259 F.R.D. 449, 464 (C.D. Cal. 2009) (“[I]f any conscious breach of a website’s terms of service is held to be sufficient by itself to constitute intentionally accessing a computer without authorization or in excess of authorization, the result will be that section 1030(a)(2)(C) becomes a law ‘that affords too much discretion to the police and too little notice to citizens who wish to use the [Internet].’”).
Note that one author argues that the law would be better off if all “unauthorized access” cases were based only on code-based restrictions, arguing that “contract-based” restrictions are harder to define. Orin S. Kerr, “Cybercrime’s Scope: Interpreting ‘Access’ and ‘Authorization’ in Computer Misuse Statutes,” 78 N.Y.U. L. Rev. 1596 (2003). However, this proposal would essentially read “exceeding authorized access” out of the statute, which the author generally acknowledges. Id.at 1662-63.
Prosecuting Computer Crimes issues are difficult to untangle, but this argument generally arises in one of three contexts: (1) the authorizing party has expressly prohibited the defendant from accessing the computer for the improper purpose; (2) the authorizing party has expressly prohibited the defendant from using the authorizing party’s data for the improper purpose but did not condition the defendant’s computer access on compliance with this prohibition; and (3) the authorizing party did not expressly prohibit the defendant from using its data for the improper purpose, but the defendant was acting against the authorizing party’s interests.
The first category of cases is the least controversial. Because the authorizing party explicitly imposed a purpose-based limitation on the defendant’s computer access, a defendant exceeds authorized access when he accesses the computer for an expressly forbidden purpose.
See, e.g., United States v. John, 597 F.3d 263, 272 (5th Cir. 2010) (“Access to a computer and data that can be obtained from that access may be exceeded if the purposes for which the access has been given are exceeded.”);
Cont’l Group, Inc. v. KW Prop. Mgmt., LLC, 622 F. Supp. 2d 1357, 1372 (S.D. Fla. 2009) (computer access policies stated that computers were provided “for business use” and were “to be used solely for the [authorizing party’s] purposes”); United States v. Salum, 257 Fed.
Appx. 225, 227 (11th Cir. 2007) (officers could access NCIC system only for official business of criminal justice agency);
Register.com, Inc. v. Verio, Inc., 126 F. Supp. 2d 238, 242-43, 248 (S.D.N.Y. 2000), aff’d, 356 F.3d 393 (2d Cir. 2004) (in order to submit query to website, users must agree not to use responsive data for direct marketing activities);
United States v. Czubinski, 106 F.3d 1069, 1071 (1st Cir. 1997) (“[IRS] employees may not use any Service computer system for other than official purposes.”). It may be more difficult to prove that a defendant exceeded authorized access in the second category of cases. In these cases, the authorizing party has expressly prohibited the defendant from using the authorizing party’s data for certain purposes, but it did not condition the defendant’s computer access on compliance with this prohibition. For example, the defendant might have signed a confidentiality agreement in which he agreed not to use the authorizing party’s information for personal gain, but the agreement did not specifically prohibit the defendant from accessing the authorizing party’s computer for that purpose. In essence, the authorizing party has explicitly limited the defendant’s authorization to use information that he might find on the computer, but it has not imposed the same purpose-based limitations on the defendant’s authorization to obtain or alter that information. The CFAA
1. Computer Fraud and Abuse Act provides that a defendant “exceeds authorized access” when he “obtain[s] or alter[s] information in the computer that [he] is not entitled so to obtain or alter,” 18 U.S.C. § 1030(e)(6), but it does not discuss using the information in an unauthorized way. Because of this statutory language, several courts have concluded that defendants did not “exceed authorized access” when they were permitted to obtain certain information from the computers, but then used that information for a specifically forbidden purpose.
See, e.g. Brett Senior & Assocs, P.C. v. Fitzgerald, 2007 WL 2043377, at *4 (E.D. Pa. 2007) (defendant permissibly copied data from computer but then allegedly used data in a way that violated his employment contract); Int’l Ass’n of Machinists and Aerospace
Workers v. Werner-Masuda, 390 F. Supp. 2d 479, 498-99 (D. Md. 2005) (defendant was authorized to access data on proprietary website but then violated agreement not to use the data for certain purposes). However, at least one circuit has upheld an “exceeding authorized access” claim in this context.
See EF Cultural Travel BV v. Explorica, 274 F.3d 577, 582-83 (1st Cir. 2001) (defendant exceeded authorized access by disclosing computer data in violation of confidentiality agreement).
The third and final category of “improper purposes” cases is arguably the most controversial. In these cases, the defendant accessed the computer within the limits of his authorization but used the computer for a purpose that was contrary to the implicit interests or intent of the authorizing party.
The case law is divided on whether these facts are sufficient to establish that the defendant exceeded authorized access. Some courts have concluded that the improper purpose, without more, establishes that the defendant exceeded authorized access.
See, e.g., Motorola, Inc. v. Lemko Corp. 609 F. Supp. 2d 760, 767 (N.D. Ill. 2009) (“Allegations that an employee e-mailed and downloaded confidential information for an improper purpose are sufficient to state a claim that the employee exceeded her authorization.”). These cases typically rely on the reasoning set forth in Citrin, 440 F.3d at 420-21, which is discussed in more detail in the previous subsection.
However, a number of recent civil cases have rejected the idea that users can exceed authorized access within the meaning of section 1030(e)(6) when they access information that they are authorized to access, even if their access is motivated by an implicitly improper purpose.
See, e.g., LVRC Holdings LLC v. Brekka, 581 F.3d 1127, 1135 n.7 (9th Cir. 2009) (stating in dicta that defendant does not “exceed authorized access” under the CFAA when he
breaches a duty of loyalty to authorizing party); Bell Aerospace Services, Inc. v.

Prosecuting Computer Crimes
U.S. Aero Services, Inc. 690 F. Supp. 2d 1267 (M.D. Ala. 2010); Orbit One Communications, Inc. v. Numerex Corp., 652 F. Supp. 2d 373 (S.D.N.Y. 2010);
National City Bank v. Republic Mortgage Home Loans, 2010 WL 959925 (W.D. Wash. 2010);
RedMedPar, Inc. v. Allparts Medical, LLC, 683 F. Supp. 2d 605
(M.D. Tenn. 2010); U.S. Bioservices Corp. v. Lugo, 595 F. Supp. 2d 1189, 1192 (D. Kan. 2009) (collecting cases);
Jet One Group, Inc. v. Halcyon Jet Holdings, Inc., 2009 WL 2524864, at *5-6 (E.D.N.Y. 2009);
Brett Senior & Assocs, P.C. v. Fitzgerald, 2007 WL 2043377, at *4 (E.D. Pa. 2007).
B. Obtaining National Security Information:
18 U.S.C. §1030(a)(1)
The infrequently-used section 1030(a)(1) punishes the act of obtaining national security information without or in excess of authorization and then willfully providing or attempting to provide the information to an unauthorized recipient, or willfully retaining the information.
Any steps in investigating or indicting a case under section 1030(a)(1) require the prior approval of the National Security Division of the Department of Justice, through the Counterespionage Section. See USAM 9-90.020. Please contact them at (202) 514-1187.
Title 18, United States Code, Section 1030(a)(1) provides:
Whoever—
(1) having knowingly accessed a computer without authorization or exceeding authorized access, and by means of such conduct having obtained information that has been determined by the United States Government pursuant to an Executive order or statute to require protection against unauthorized disclosure for reasons of national defense or foreign relations, or any restricted data, as defined in paragraph y. of section 11 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, with reason to believe that such information so obtained could be used to the injury of the United States, or 1030(a)(1) Summary (Felony)
1. Knowingly access computer without or in excess of authorization
2. Obtain national security information
3. Reason to believe the information could injure the U.S. or benefit a foreign nation, willful communication, delivery, transmission (or attempt) OR willful retention of the information
1. Computer Fraud and Abuse Act to the advantage of any foreign nation willfully communicates, delivers, transmits, or causes to be communicated, delivered, or transmitted, or attempts to communicate, deliver, transmit or cause to be communicated, delivered, or transmitted the same to any person not entitled to receive it, or willfully retains the same and fails to deliver it to the officer or employee of the United States entitled to receive it . . .shall be punished as provided in subsection (c) of this section.
1. Knowingly Access a Computer Without or In Excess of Authorization
A violation of this section requires proof that the defendant knowingly accessed a computer without authorization or in excess of authorization. This covers both completely unauthorized individuals who intrude into a computer containing national security information as well as insiders with limited privileges who manage to access portions of a computer or computer network to which they have not been granted access. The scope of authorization will depend upon the facts of each case. However, it is worth noting that computers and computer networks containing national security information will normally be classified and incorporate security safeguards and access controls of their own, which should facilitate proving this element.
Please see page 5 for the discussion of access and authorization.
2. Obtain National Security Information.
A violation of this section requires that the information obtained is national security information, meaning information “that has been determined by the United States Government pursuant to an Executive Order or statute to require protection against unauthorized disclosure for reasons of national defense or foreign relations, or any restricted data, as defined in paragraph 14. of section 11 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954.” An example of national security information used in section 1030(a)(1) would be classified information obtained from a Department of Defense computer or restricted data obtained from a Department of Energy computer. Prosecuting Computer Crimes.
3. Information Could Injure the United States or Benefit a Foreign Nation. A violation of this section requires proof that the defendant had reason to believe that the national security information so obtained could be used to the injury of the United States or to the advantage of any foreign nation. The fact that the national security information is classified or restricted, along with proof of the defendant’s knowledge of that fact, should be sufficient to establish this element of the offense.
4. Willful Communication, Delivery, Transmission, or Retention A violation of this section requires proof that the defendant willfully communicated, delivered, or transmitted the national security information, attempted to do so, or willfully retained the information instead of delivering it to the intended recipient. This element could be proven through evidence showing that the defendant did any of the following:
(a) communicated, delivered, or transmitted national security information, or caused it to be communicated, delivered, or transmitted, to any person not entitled to receive it; (b) attempted to communicate, deliver, or transmit national security information, or attempted to cause it to be communicated, delivered, or transmitted to any person not entitled to receive it; or (c) willfully retained national security information and failed to deliver it to an officer or employee of the United States who is entitled to receive it in the course of their official duties.
5. Penalties Convictions under this section are felonies punishable by a fine, imprisonment for not more than ten years, or both. 18 U.S.C. §1030(c)(1)(A). A violation that occurs after another conviction under section 1030 is punishable by a fine, imprisonment for not more than twenty years, or both. 18 U.S.C. §1030(c)(1)(B). 6.
Relation to Other Statutes Section 1030(a)(1) was originally enacted in 1984 and was substantially amended in 1996. As originally enacted, section 1030(a)(1) provided that anyone who knowingly accessed a computer without authorization or in excess of authorization and obtained classified information “with the intent or reason to believe that such information so obtained is to be used to the injury of the 1. Computer Fraud and Abuse Act 15 United States, or to the advantage of any foreign nation” was subject to a fine or imprisonment for not more than ten years for a first offense. This scienter element mirrored that of 18 U.S.C. §794(a), the statute that prohibits gathering or delivering defense information to aid a foreign government. Section 794(a), however, provides for life imprisonment, whereas section 1030(a)(1) is only a ten-year felony. Based on that distinction, Congress amended section 1030(a)(1) in 1996 to track more closely the language of 18 U.S.C. §793(e), which also provides a maximum penalty of ten years imprisonment for obtaining from any source certain information connected with the national defense and thereafter communicating or attempting to communicate it in an unauthorized manner.
Violations of this subsection are charged quite rarely. The reason for this lack of prosecution may well be the close similarities between sections1030(a)(1) and 793(e). In situations where both statutes are applicable, prosecutors may tend towards using section 793(e), for which guidance and precedent are more prevalent.
Although sections 793(e) and 1030(a)(1) overlap, the two statutes do not reach exactly the same conduct. Section 1030(a)(1) requires proof that the individual knowingly accessed a computer without or in excess of authority and thereby obtained national security information, and subsequently performed some unauthorized communication or other improper act with that data. In this way, it focuses not only on the possession of, control over, or subsequent transmission of the information (as section 793(e) does), but also focuses on the improper use of a computer to obtain the information itself. Existing espionage laws such as section 793(e) provide solid grounds for the prosecution of individuals who attempt to peddle governmental secrets to foreign governments. However, when a person, without authorization or in excess of authorized access, deliberately accesses a computer, obtains national security information, and seeks to transmit or communicate that information to any prohibited person, prosecutors should consider charging a violation section 1030(a)(1) in addition to considering charging a violation of section 793(e).
One other issue to note is that section 808 of the USA PATRIOT Act added section 1030(a)(1) to the list of crimes in that are considered “Federal Crime[s] of Terrorism” under 18 U.S.C. §2332b(g)(5)(B). This addition affects prosecutions under section 1030(a)(1) in three ways. First, because offenses listed under section 2332b(g)(5)(B) are now incorporated into 18 16
Prosecuting Computer Crimes: U.S.C. §3286, the statute of limitation for subsection (a)(1) is extended to eight years and is eliminated for offenses that result in, or create a foreseeable risk of, death or serious bodily injury to another person. Second, the term of supervised release after imprisonment for any offense listed under section 2332b(g)(5)(B) that results in, or creates a foreseeable risk of, death or serious bodily injury to another person, can be any term of years or life. 18 U.S.C. §3583. Formerly, the maximum term of supervised release for any violation of section 1030 was five years. Third, the USA PATRIOT Act added the offenses listed in section 2332b(g)(5)(B) to 18 U.S.C. §1961(1), making them predicate offenses for prosecutions under the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) statute. As a result, any “RICO enterprise” (which may include terrorist groups) that violates section 1030(a)(1) (or section 1030(a)(5)(A)) can now be prosecuted under the RICO statute.
C. Accessing a Computer and Obtaining Information: 18 U.S.C. §1030(a)(2)
The distinct but overlapping crimes established by the three subsections of section 1030(a)(2) punish the unauthorized access of different types of information and computers. Violations of this section are misdemeanors unless aggravating factors exist. Title 18, United States Code, Section 1030(a)(2) provides:
Whoever—
(2) intentionally accesses a computer without authorization or exceeds authorized access, and thereby obtains—
(A) information contained in a financial record of a financial institution, or of a card issuer as defined in section 1602(n) of title 15, or contained in a file of 1030(a)(2) Summary (Misd.)
1. Intentionally access a computer
2. Without or in excess of authorization
3. Obtain information
4. From financial records of financial institution or consumer reporting agency OR the U.S. government OR a protected computer (Felony)
5. Committed for commercial advantage or private financial gain OR committed in furtherance of any criminal or tortious act OR the value of the information obtained exceeds $5,000

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